jathis:

min-min-minnie:

a part of me likes to think that cecil’s first impression of carlos wasn’t nearly as eloquent as “and i fell in love instantly”

TATER TOT

chocolatequeennk:

haliasjane:

inbetweenfictionandreality:

"I waited too long to read the sequel, and now I can’t even remember the characters."

 A novel by me

"I read the whole series in less than two days, and now can’t separate the events of individual books" the thrilling sequel

"I’ve read so much fanfic for this series, I can’t remember what really happened in the books" the stunning conclusion

saveintheflesh:

We thought we’d set a little challenge for this weeks Social Media Sunday! This month we’re asking you to make an In The Flesh fanmix. The topic? Up to you! Get in the Halloween spirit with a spoopy zombie mix, or create a heartbreaking Kieren/Rick mix. Go wild!

Fanmixes are to be posted at 10pm on Sunday the 26th of October! Make sure to Tweet, Tumblr and Facebook them, tagging bbcthree and Dominic Mitchell! We’ll be reblogging the results over here at saveintheflesh. We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

What is a Social Media Sunday?

Read up more about Social Media Sunday’s here and here!

Who do I @mention?

There’s a handy list of individuals and accounts to message and mention in part four of this post.

I’ve heard a lot about In The Flesh, but what exactly is it about?

In the Flesh is a BAFTA award winning BBC supernatural drama series in the same vein as Being Human and The Fades. It depicts life in the fictional English village of Roarton after “The Rising”, with a medication that returns consciousness to the undead having been found before the events of the show. It stars Luke Newberry as Kieren Walker, an 18-year-old bisexual/pansexual PDS (“Partially Deceased Syndrome”) sufferer who returns home to extreme prejudice from the conservative townsfolk and alienation from his sister, who - during The Rising - was part of a militia dedicated to hunting down his kind.

Read more (and learn where to watch it) here and here.

I can’t make graphics!

Drop us a message - we might be able to make one for you or find someone who can!

gayturians:

don’t say you’re a writer if you just write fanfiction for your entertainment. you’re only a writer if you kill a bear with a typewriter to appease the spirit of hemingway and slather yourself in ink in tribute to shakespeare, the one true over-penis of literature.

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.

There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.

Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.

The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?

Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

mostly10:

nine reasons why I wish we could see jensen’s selfies

bonus 9.5:

image

exoticshorthairs:

I picked it myself human.

Samwise Gamgee: If Frodo is going to Mordor then so am I.
Elrond: omg yaaas so cute i ship it omg feels are coursing through my elvish body
Merry & Pippin: Us too lol
Elrond: SHADOW AND MIST, ELROND'S PISSED
cursor by thetremblingofmyhand